If You See Something, Say Something

Yesterday’s incident at Platte Valley provides a reminder and opportunity for our watchfulness. Thank you again to our Labor and Delivery staff whose quick action led to swift response by our security team and the Brighton Police Department (details were sent via email yesterday).

As a reminder, weapons are not permitted in any of our facilities. If you see someone with a firearm or knife inside any of our buildings, ask them to take their weapon back outside or call security at X1461 to assess the situation. If they refuse, call 911. With everyone’s attention every day, we will ensure the safety and security of our associates, patients and visitors.

Our On-Site Security Team & Commitment to Your Safety
We have an on-site security team here to help us provide safe and compassionate care. Security is provided by our Plant Services team Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. If a security incident happens during this time, please call Mai at x1451. HSS Security Services provides security Mon – Fri, 4 p.m. to 8 a.m. and 24 hours a day on Saturdays and Sundays. Our HSS officer can be reached by calling x1461.

As part of our on-going effort to ensure everyone’s safety, we conduct regular safety and security risk assessments and will soon have security coverage 24/7. HSS Security Services provides security for most SCL Health care sites, including Platte Valley. And while the start date for 24/7 coverage has not yet been determined, HSS is presently recruiting a full staff for Platte Valley. When we are ready to implement the program, more information such as security procedures, contact information, and security staff duties will be provided.

The full-time security staff will help us prepare for many emergency situations – ranging from active shooters, hostage situations, and other security challenges to threats from fires, tornadoes, floods, and even pandemics of infectious diseases.

Please know the safety and security of our associates, patients and guests is our number one priority. If you have a safety concern, please call X1461.

Almost Home Thanksgiving Box Donations

Every year at Thanksgiving, our associates rally together and raise money to support a Almost Home’s Thanksgiving Box Program to provide meals for 300 families in our area.

Last year we raised over $3,600, but we can probably beat that easily this year! Peggy Jarrett is taking donations through tomorrow — Thursday, November 16.  She will be in the Bistro tomorrow from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to receive donations in person.

Almost Home is a nonprofit organization in Brighton helping families that are homeless or lacking sufficient resources to keep a roof over their heads.

Please consider giving, even if you can only spare a little extra. It means so much to a family to be able to have a nice Thanksgiving meal.

See this flyer for additional information or call Peggy Jarrett with any questions.

Mind Body Team Seeks Associate Teachers

It’s no longer unusual to start a meeting at Platte Valley with a few deep breaths and a stretch, to sit and chart with a sandbag on your lap, or stand back to back with a co-worker when you’re feeling stressed.  These simple techniques are part of our Mind Body Connection program, which focuses on increasing self-awareness and taking a moment to care for you, which will ultimately improve the quality of your interactions with patients and co-workers – truly a win-win situation.

Many of these concepts stem from the teachings of Matthew Sanford, a yoga teacher, writer and owner of Mind Body Solutions, a non-profit in Minneapolis.  Matthew is paralyzed as a result of a car accident when he was 13, so his experiences as a patient serve to enlighten us as providers.  He has visited Platte Valley twice, and the approach he introduced has been carried on with our Mind Body team.

In the past year, we have brought these techniques to several departments, incorporated them into meetings, presented at the SCL SHINE conference and held sessions for Hospital Week and community gatherings.  We’ve been energized by the positive responses we’ve received and the success stories we’ve heard.  Now we’d like your help to continue spreading the word!

We’re looking for associates to assist in teaching their co-workers some of these techniques.  If you went to Matthew’s workshop, you have a head start, but our team can help train you as well.  If you have an interest in this work, please contact Karen Vizyak, Physical Medicine Director at X1844 or Christine Salvi, Patient Experience Director at X3635 for more information.

Mental Health First Aid Classes Available

One of the priority areas that came out of the 2016 Community Health Needs Assessment for PVMC was Mental Health and Substance Abuse. To help address this, SCL Health is providing the Mental Health First Aid course along with Community Reach Center. The class is free to attend for everyone and the information is invaluable as we see more issues within our community and the hospital. If you know someone in the community that would benefit from this opportunity, please pass this along to them.

These classes do have a minimum required class size, and will be cancelled if enough people do not sign up. Please consider taking this valuable class.

Upcoming Classes:

  • First Responder & Emergency Department Class: Wednesday, November 29 at 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. in the Medical Plaza 2 Conference Room. To register: http://bit.ly/2yxSPoI
  • Tuesday Dec 12, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. in Medical Plaza 2 Conference Room. To register: http://bit.ly/2xlZRfT

About Mental Health First Aid:

  • Evidence-based training program empowering individuals to identify, understand and respond to others who might be experiencing a mental health or substance abuse crisis
  • Enhances ability to intervene in the event of a mental health emergency
  • Population health approach to behavioral health helps to raise awareness and intervention skills while reducing the stigma around mental health
  • Movement to train a greater number of individuals across the country to improve prevention efforts against anxiety,depression and other mental health disorders
  • Similar to previous efforts to increase the number of individuals with CPR/First Aid knowledge…more education = more lives saved!

New Faces in Oncology

A few changes have recently been made to our oncology clinic. Dr. William Lee is no longer operating a clinic within our oncology department, but will remain on-call until further notice. Two new physicians will be joining us from National Jewish Health, Dr. Shivani Shinde and Dr. Robert Kantor.

Dr. Shivani Shinde is an oncology specialist at National Jewish Health. She received her medical degree from Grant Medical College, completed her residency at the University of Illinois, and a fellowship in Hematology and Oncology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester. She is Board Certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in both Hematology and Oncology.

Dr. Robert Kantor is also an oncology specialist from National Jewish Health. He attended Wayne State University for his medical degree, completed his residency at Presbyterian/St Luke’s Medical Center, and a fellowship in Hematology and Oncology at Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation. Dr. Kantor is also Board Certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in both Hematology and Oncology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both doctors specialize in all adult cancers, including breast, colon, lung, and prostate cancer, as well as blood disorders, lymphoma, leukemia and melanoma.

Additionally, we welcome two new staff members. Elizabeth Schneider is our new Director of Oncology Services. Liz is already a valuable and capable associate in our Platte Valley family, and we welcome her warmly to this role. We are also excited to welcome Ginger Carmichael as our Oncology Services Manager. Ginger has an extensive oncology background; she has been an Oncology Certified RN for over 10 years and is known for providing quality patient care. Ginger will join us on November 27.

Safety Behavior of the Month: Clear and Complete Communication

Commit to Clear and Complete Communication: 3-Way Repeat-Back
Communication is not just the exchange of information. It is the exchange of information with understanding. Using the 3-way repeat-back allows us an opportunity to confirm that what was said is what was heard. When exchanging information:

  • The Sender initiates communication using the Receiver’s Name. The Sender provides an order, request or information to the Receiver in a clear and concise format.The Receiver acknowledges receipt by a repeat-back of the order, request or information.
  • The Sender acknowledges the accuracy of the repeat-back by saying, “That’s correct!” If not correct, the Sender repeats the communication emphasizing the correction.

Common uses of the 3-way repeat-back include handling of sharps, critical lab values, verbal and telephone orders.

Teach-Back
Healthcare literacy is an issue we face every day. When giving instructions or teaching someone something new, it is critical to validate their understanding. Using the teach back method allows us to evaluate their understanding and make corrections when something is misunderstood or misinterpreted. In validating understanding, it is important to avoid questions like, “Do you have any questions?” Instead use statements that start with, “Tell me…” or “Show me…” Here are some examples:

  • “Tell me how you would know if…”
  • “Tell me what you would do if…”
  • “Show me how you would…”

Common uses of the teach-back method are when precepting someone, providing education to patients and families, or anytime you are giving instructions. If you would like to download the flyer for this month’s safety behavior, you can click here.

Seats Open in Healthy Cooking Demo

Are you interested in learning how to prepare tasty, nutritious meals from scratch for the upcoming holiday season? Join Chef Mike and Registered Dietitian Melissa for a live cooking demo. Learn to prepare healthier holiday meals, and how to modify some of the recipes you already love. Bring your friends!

Healthy from Scratch for the Holidays: A Live Cooking Demo
Thursday November 9, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Conference Room A
Space is limited so sign up online or by calling Evelyn at X1481.

New VP of Finance Joins Platte Valley

We are excited to announce that Sean Fadden has accepted the position of Vice President of Finance for Platte Valley Medical Center. As Vice President, Sean will be responsible for the financial operations of Platte Valley and continued integration of Platte Valley to the SCL Health family. He will be at Platte Valley full time beginning December 4.

Sean has been with SCL Health for more than five years, starting at Lutheran Medical Center as a Senior Financial Analyst. He then transitioned to a system services management role to support the implementation of a systemwide stewardship program. He most recently served as Manager of Business Analytics with the Enterprise Business Analytics team.

Sean has been instrumental in the development and implementation of the SCL Health stewardship program. His engagement and financial management support have been a key part of the success of achieving more than $146 million in stewardship savings over the past two years.   With the consolidation of the Stewardship and Decision Support teams under Sean’s leadership, the newly formed Enterprise Business Analytics team has advanced, standardized and much improved the financial reporting for the care sites.

Sean earned a bachelor’s degree in business management and economics from Salisbury University in Maryland. He is currently pursuing an MBA in finance and accounting from Regis University. He lives in Denver with his wife, Lauren, and their two dogs. He enjoys outdoor activities, traveling, and house projects.

Sean is currently on his honeymoon, so unfortunately he’s unavailable for a better photo. However, he’s a friendly guy, so we’re sure he will introduce himself far and wide when he gets back. Please join us in welcoming Sean to his new role!

 

Quick Decision Turns into Great Catch

Last weekend, our friends at Hudson Fire and our own Platte Valley medics started advanced cardiac life support on a patient out in the field. Working together, they were able to return circulation, stabilize, and transport the patient to the ER. Upon arrival, Dr. Stafford quickly realized the patient was having a heart attack and needed a Cardiac Cath procedure. Since it was the weekend and our Cath Lab was closed, we arranged for a transfer to Good Samaritan. The patient was ventilated needed a critical care team, with a nurse, during transport.

“We called every nearby agency, and they were all 30 minutes to an hour away. So instead of waiting, I went (as the nurse) with Platte Valley Ambulance,” explained House Supervisor and Nurse Andrea Moore. “I made the decision to go because I wanted our patient to get to the cath lab quickly to increase chances of recovery. And because our EMS crew was so willing to do the right thing, we were able to get to Good there within a reasonable amount of time.”

Justin, Megan, Roger, Andrea and Sean’s quick actions were instrumental last weekend.

“Great teamwork and flexibility was demonstrated by many amazing associates during the care of this patient,” explains Vice President of Operations Kurt Gensert. “I am proud to work with a team who make unselfish, smart decisions every day keep our patients safe. There’s no doubt their quick actions were responsible for ensuring a safe transport.”

Congratulations to everyone involved for your quick actions.

Editor’s note: this story was brought to our attention on Monday. If you have a quick story to share about safe care, great catches, or even someone’s experience, please email your idea or news tip to: evelyn.wiant@sclhs.net.

 

PVMC Legacy Wireless Networks To Be Disabled

Now that PVMC is using the SCL standard wireless networks, we are making plans to disable the legacy PVMC wireless networks.

The new SCL wireless networks that are now in place include:

  • SCLHS (this is the primary for laptops, etc.)
  • SLCHS_VOIP (used for corporate VOIP telephones devices like SpectraLinks)
  • SCLHS_BIOMED (used for BioMed equipment)
  • SCLHS_PUBLIC (this is the public guest wireless network for patients, visitors, personal cell phones and laptops, etc.)

The legacy PVMC wireless networks that will be disabled include:

  • PVMC_Mobile
  • PVMC_Svc
  • PVMC_Guest (this has already been disabled)

There are a great deal of personal devices – smart phones, laptops – that are currently connecting to PVMC_Mobile and PVMC_Svc. We recommend you reconfigure your devices to instead connect with SCLHS_PUBLIC. We know that there are also quite a few corporate devices still pointing to the legacy PVMC networks as well, and the PVMC IT team will be working with those areas affected to ensure they get moved as well.

Our target date to disable the legacy PVMC networks is February 1, please make these changes to your personal devices as soon as possible. The IT department will send out reminders between now and then, and please reach out to Tim Branningan at timothy.brannigan@sclhs.net or the PVMC IT team with any questions in the meantime.

 

Two Months Left to File PTO Cash Outs

We only have a couple months left to accept PTO cash outs.   If you want to cash out PTO fill out the Platte Valley cash out form.  Please add your S number to the top of it. Your Director needs to sign it. Turn the forms in to PVMC Accounting no later than 11 am on Thursdays prior to pay period end date to get them in for the following check date. If you have 120 hours accrued in 2017 you can cash out up to this amount this year.  You must leave 24 hours in your bank to use for time off. The last day to turn in PTO cash outs is December 13!

Cyber Security Awareness Month – Helping Others Secure Themselves

As October ends, so does Enterprise Security’s Annual Cyber Security Awareness Month. This year we have focused on several topics;

  • Week 1: The Truth about Data Breaches walked through the Equifax breach and how to protect your identity after this breach.
  • Week 2: Focused how to protect SCL Health confidential information such as patient and credit card information.
  • Week 3: Explained Social Engineering and how to not fall victim to a scam at work or at home.
  • In week 4 we are focusing on how to help others secure themselves. This may be a parent, a child, a neighbor, or anybody who does not feel comfortable in how to securely use technology.

Many of us feel comfortable with technology, to include how to use it safely and securely. However, other friends or family members may not feel so comfortable. In fact, they may be confused, intimidated, or even scared by it. This makes them very vulnerable to today’s cyber attackers. Cyber security at home does not have to be scary, and you can help guide them in understanding the basics.

Five Simple Steps
Here are five simple steps you can take to help others overcome those fears and securely make the most of today’s technology.

  1. Social Engineering: Social engineering is a common technique used by cyber attackers to trick or fool people into doing something they should not do, such as sharing their password, infecting their computer, or sharing sensitive information. This is nothing new. Scams and con artists have existed for thousands of years. The only difference now is bad guys are applying these same concepts to the Internet. You can help others by explaining to them the most common clues of a social engineering attack, such as when someone creates a tremendous sense of urgency, when something is too good to be true, or when a cyber-attacker pretends to be someone you know but their messages don’t sound like them. Share examples of common social engineering attacks, such as phishing emails or the infamous Microsoft tech-support phone calls. If nothing else, make sure family members understand they should never give their password to anyone or allow remote access to their computer.
  2. Passwords: Strong passwords are key to protecting devices and any online accounts. Walk your family members through how to create strong passwords. We recommend passphrases, as they are the easiest to both type and remember. Passphrases are nothing more than passwords made up of multiple words. In addition, help them to install and use a password manager. It is important to have a unique password for each of your devices and accounts. Finally, help them enable two-step verification (often called two-factor authentication) for important accounts. Two-step verification is one of the most effective steps you can take to secure any account.
  3. Patching: Keeping systems current and fully up-to-date is a key step anyone can take to secure their devices. This is not only true for your computers and mobile devices, but anything connected to the Internet, such as gaming consoles, thermometers, or even lights or speakers. The simplest way to ensure all devices are current is to enable automatic updating whenever possible.
  4. Anti-Virus: People make mistakes. We sometimes click on or install things we probably should not, which could infect our systems. Anti-virus is designed to protect us from those mistakes. While anti-virus cannot stop all malware, it does help detect and stop the more common attacks. As such, make sure any home computers have anti-virus installed and that it is current and active. In addition, many of today’s anti-virus solutions include other security technology, such as firewalls and browser protection.
  5. Backups: When all else fails, backups are often the only way you can recover from mistakes (like deleting the wrong files) or cyber-attacks, like ransomware. Make sure family and friends have a file backup system in place. These solutions make it easy not only to back up data, but to recover it.

Enterprise Information Security hopes you found the information presented during this year’s Cybersecurity Awareness Month useful and helpful. You can view other cyber education topics on our page on The Landing or via HealthStream. It is our intent to not only educate to protect SCL Health but your family and home from cyber-attacks that can have a large impact on your personal life and finances.

Thank you for all you do in protecting SCL Health and our patients from data breaches! If you have questions please reach out to enterprisesecurity@sclhs.net.

Flu Vaccine Deadline is Next Tues!

Protect yourself and our patients by getting your shot. All employees, volunteers, and medical staff must receive a flu shot before October 31.

This is a firm deadline! The flu vaccine is mandatory unless you have an approved exemption. (Failure to obtain the influenza vaccine, provide proof of vaccination, or provide the signed medical or religious exemption form by October 31 will result in suspension from work starting Nov 1 for up to 3 business days. SCL Health will consider non-compliance after the 3 day suspension period as a voluntary resignation.) There are only two “approved” exemptions for the influenza vaccination:

  • a documented, severe (life-threatening) allergy to eggs or to other components of the influenza vaccine
  • a history of Guillain-Barre Syndrome within six weeks following a previous dose of influenza vaccine.
  • Please contact Employee Health at x1495 as soon as possible if you have an exemption.

The seasonal flu vaccine is free for all employees. Each employee who receives the vaccination will also receive candy and a fountain drink coupon. Vaccines are now only available by going to the Occupational Health (formerly Employee Health) office between 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the 3rd floor of the main hospital building. For night shift and weekend staff, the House Supervisor will be available to give the shot.

If you’d like to get your flu shot from a non-PVMC clinic, you will need to bring in proof of your vaccination in order to be compliant.

Cyber Security Awareness Month – Social Engineering

A common misconception most people have about cyber attackers is that they use only highly advanced tools and techniques to hack into people’s computers or accounts. This is simply not true. Cyber attackers have learned that often the easiest way to steal your information, hack your accounts, or infect your systems is by simply tricking you into making a mistake. This week, you will learn how these attacks, called social engineering, work and what you can do to protect yourself.

What is Social Engineering?

Social engineering is a psychological attack where an attacker tricks you into doing something you should not do. The concept of social engineering is not new; it has existed for thousands of years. Think of scammers or con artists, it is the very same idea. What makes today’s technology so much more effective for cyber attackers is you cannot physically see them; they can easily pretend to be anything or anyone they want and target millions of people around the world, including you. In addition, social engineering attacks can bypass many security technologies. The simplest way to understand how these attacks work and protect yourself from them is to take a look at two real-world examples.

You receive a phone call from someone claiming to be from a computer support company, your ISP, or Microsoft Tech Support. The caller explains that your computer is actively scanning the Internet. They believe it is infected and have been tasked with helping you secure your computer. They then use a variety of technical terms and take you through confusing steps to convince you that your computer is infected. For example, they may ask you to check if you have certain files on your computer and walk you through how to find them. When you locate these files, the caller assures you that these files prove that your computer is infected, when in reality they are common system files found on almost every computer in the world. Once they have tricked you into believing your computer is infected, they pressure you into buying their security software or giving them remote access to your computer so they can fix it. However, the software they are selling is actually a malicious program. If you purchase and install their software, not only have they fooled you into infecting your computer, but you just paid them to do it. If you give them remote access to your computer, they are going to take it over, steal your data, or use it for their bidding.

Another example is an email attack called CEO Fraud, which most often happens at work. This is when a cyber-attacker researches your organization online and identifies the name of your boss or coworker. The attacker then crafts an email pretending to be from that person and sends the email to you. The email urgently asks you to take an action, such as conducting a wire transfer or emailing sensitive employee information. Quite often, these emails pretend there is an emergency that urgently requires you to bypass standard security procedures. For example, they may ask you to send the highly sensitive information to a personal @gmail.com account. What makes targeted attacks like these so dangerous is the cyber attackers do their research beforehand. In addition, security technologies like anti-virus or firewalls cannot detect or stop these attacks because there is no malware or malicious links involved.

Keep in mind, social engineering attacks like these are not limited to phone calls or email; they can happen in any form, including text messages on your phone, over social media, or even in person. The key is to know what to look out for–you are your own best defense.

Detecting/Stopping Social Engineering Attacks

Fortunately, stopping such attacks is simpler then you may think—common sense is your best defense. If something seems suspicious or does not feel right, it may be a social engineering attack. The most common clues of a social engineering attack include:

  • Someone creating a tremendous sense of urgency. They are attempting to fool you into making a mistake.
  • Someone asking for information they should not have access to or should already know, such as your account numbers.
  • Someone asking for your password. No legitimate organization will ever ask you for that.
  • Someone pressuring you to bypass or ignore security processes or procedures you are expected to follow at work.
  • Something too good to be true. For example, you are notified you won the lottery or an iPad, even though you never even entered the lottery.
  • You receive an odd email from a friend or coworker containing wording that does not sound like it is really them. A cyber attacker may have hacked into their account and is attempting to trick you. To protect yourself, verify such requests by reaching out to your friend using a different communications method, such as in person or over the phone.

If you suspect someone is trying to trick or fool you, do not communicate with the person anymore. If the attack is work related, be sure to report it to your help desk or information security team right away. Remember, common sense is often your best defense.

Please be on the lookout for further topics every week in October on how to secure and protect SCL Health’s data as well as your personal data from data breaches.

Enterprise Information Security hopes you find the information presented during Cybersecurity Awareness Month useful and helpful.  You can view other cyber education topics on our page on The Landing here or via HealthStream.  It is our intent to not only educate to protect SCL Health but your family and home from cyber-attacks that can have a large impact on your personal life and finances. Thank you for your help in protecting SCL Health and our patients from data breaches.  If you have questions please reach out to enterprisesecurity@sclhs.net.

SHINE the Light on YOU!

Save the date for the 9th Annual SHINE Conference, you won’t want to miss it this year. The Front Range care sites; Good Samaritan Medical Center, Lutheran Medical Center, Platte Valley Medical Center, and Saint Joseph Hospital have come together to present this year’s SHINE event. Our theme for this year is, SHINE the light on YOU! We will focus on helping you build your professional practice through Evidence Based Practice, as well as giving you tools and resources for your own self care.

SHINE the Light on YOU!

Monday, October 30, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saint Joseph Hospital, Russell Pavilion
1375 East 19th Ave, Denver, CO

You can register in HealthStream using keyword: SHINE9. If you have questions please e-mail Jeremy Smith at Jeremy.Smith3@sclhs.net

New Brand Templates Now Available

Our new logo is now available for your use! Starting today, you can now access our re-branded templates for letterhead, memos, fax cover sheets, and Power Point presentations, as well as our new logo in both regular size and optimized for email signatures. All of these files are easily accessible on The Landing.

How to find them:

  1. Go to The Landing home page
  2. Click the green button on the left that says “Dept & Team Sites”
  3. Click “Marketing”
  4. A list of available documents will appear on the lower right side of the screen.

Alternatively, you can:

  1. Go to The Landing home page
  2. In the menu on the left hand side of the page, click “Forms – By Department”
  3. Click “Marketing”
  4. A list of available documents will appear

Here’s How To Update Your Email Signature:

Emails from Platte Valley Medical Center associates should contain sign-off information (signature) listing your sender’s name, title, care site, contact address, email, telephone numbers and/or direct extension, fax and website, followed by our logo. You may choose to develop a shorter version for internal use only.

Please use the following brand standards when setting up your email signature.

Font: Verdana
Point size: 8
Color: Black

Example:
Jane Doe
Title, Department
Care Site Name
Street address, Suite #
City, State, Zip Code
P: 555.555.5555
M: 555.555.5555 (optional)
F: 555.555.5555
jane.doe@sclhs.net
www.pvmc.org (or care site/physician practice website)

 

 

For executive signatures, the following block may be added:

Administrative Assistant
[Insert Name]
P: 555.555.5555
[Insert email]

Please do not add background graphics, symbols or colors to email signatures. Short phrases or quotes at the end of signatures are acceptable as long as they appropriately relate to our mission, vision or values.

If you need assistance with editing your signature, here are several guides. Be sure to select the one that corresponds with your version of Outlook.

Outlook 2010 Guide

Outlook 2013 Guide

Employment Openings at Platte Valley

We all know that Platte Valley Medical Center is a great place to work. We currently have no fewer than 59 open positions waiting to be filled! If you know someone in need of a job, or who wants to work at a high-performing hospital with a culture of safety and also offers a positive work-life balance, direct them to the employment page on our website, https://pvmc.org/about-us/employment/current-openings.

 

A Moment In Time – Happiness Is

Happiness is …

By Daryl L. Meyers

… a choice. Sounds strange, doesn’t it. But it’s true. Happiness IS a choice. It’s not some magical experience that unexpectedly “happens” to us somewhere along the way, nor is it determined by where we live, our culture, or our family heritage.

As children (and often as adults) we imagine a life that arranges itself in line with our needs or desires, but things don’t always work out according to our plans. In fact seldom do they, nor do others always agree with our wishes or demands.

We may have some great relationships, but there will also be times of disagreement and disappointment. Listening to others who care is wise, but allowing their opinions to control how we live and the decisions we make is not.

Life happens the way it happens and it’s up to us to decide how to relate to the experiences we go through. If we see circumstances or events as undermining or offensive, our happiness will disappear like mist before the morning sun.

All of us must make choices. We can fight or accept what comes our way … become better or bitter. It’s up to us. By resisting or fighting “what is,” we disempower ourselves, for … “what is … IS.” … and there’s nothing we can do about it. It’s already here. It’s already happened. Our job is not to try and change whatever’s occurred (that would be impossible), but to accept.

Although we may not be consciously aware, on some level we call to ourselves people and situations that help move us from who we think we are, to who we really are. We begin to understand a universal truth. Life doesn’t happen “to us” but “through us.” This process is gradual, ongoing and constant. How we relate to what we go through determines the measure of joy and happiness we experience.

When we embrace the darkness as well as the light; when we see the gift in every experience, regardless of the forms in which they come, we will know that all things do work together for our good. It is then, regardless of how difficult or challenging the way, that happiness will no longer be a fleeting experience, determined by whim or circumstance, or the opinions and actions of others, but will always be … all ways… a choice.

 

 

ED Director Assists with Hurricane Disaster Relief

Recently, after returning from a 21-day deployment, Wendy Colon, Director of PVMC’s Emergency Department, made an appearance on Fox 31’s “Good Day Colorado” news program where she shared her experiences involving hurricane relief efforts in the U.S. and the Caribbean.

Wendy and her 36-member National Disaster Medical System team, of which she was the Commander, were deployed to Texas, and eventually ended up in Puerto Rico where she and her team provided emergency medical and mental health assistance.

Her team of physicians, nurses, paramedics, administrators, logistics and mental health personnel, assisted with a broad range of emergency needs resulting from hurricane Harvey, in Texas, and also in Puerto Rico and St. John (US Virgin Islands) after the damage caused by hurricane Irma.

In Puerto Rico, they was involved in repatriation work at the airport, and also opened a dialysis shelter for more than 120 dialysis patients that came from the Virgin Islands.

Together Wendy’s team along with medical personnel from other parts of the States were able to assist with the medical emergency needs and temporary shelters for thousands of residents affected by the recent hurricanes.

“This was such a rewarding experience for me and my team,” said Wendy. “Thank you all for the support that you gave me and the ED while I was gone.  I appreciated the time to be able to do this important work.”

 

St. John

 

 

Remembering the Children

Maria Lochran began collecting children’s books for PVMC and Salud in 2014 when she noticed the medical facilities she was visiting had adult magazines, but very little for children waiting with their parents. It was then she made the decision to take the money she received from her garage sales to purchase children’s books, which she donated, to Platte Valley Medical Center and Salud.

The first year she donated 400 books, the second year over 900 and even though she had a stroke, managed to donate another 200 books last year (contributed by Connie Haney on her behalf through a contact made by Linda Young).

A very big THANK YOU to Maria is definitely in order for remembering the children  (and their parents) visiting our hospital.

 

Linda Young, Sheryl Sorensen (PVMC Director of Volunteers), Mary Ladwig and Maria Lochran (wheelchair)

Understanding the Brand Refresh

What is the Brand Refresh project?

The Brand Refresh project is an evolution, a merging of our system goals and our patient’s desires. We are engaging our associates, providers and our communities in this transformation, so that we create a version of SCL Health that creates satisfaction, preference and loyalty in everyone we serve.

You may be wondering, why are we refreshing the SCL Health brand?

SCL Health is on a mission to transform our system into a truly patient-centered organization through:

  • New partnerships
  • New care environments
  • New ways to access care
  • Exciting digital and telehealth initiatives

As patient expectations for healthcare continue to evolve, we need to reflect this transformation of our system in how we present ourselves internally and externally.

What does “patient centered” mean to SCL Health:

By the end of the week, our new logo will be live on our website. Here’s a glance at a few of the other system logos too:

 

 

 

Now that you have some insight into the Brand Refresh project, you probably have some questions. Please email any questions you might have about the Brand Refresh to evelyn.wiant@sclhs.net, or leave them as comments here on the ICE.

Physician Directory Now Available on The Landing

Provider information for all members of the PVMC Medical Staff (Physicians and Advanced Practice providers) is now available to all PVMC Associates on The Landing in the Dept & Team Sites.  There’s also a quick link button on the right hand side of the Platte Valley Landing page.

The new “Physician Directory” gives you the ability to look for providers by name or specialty.

Information available on each provider includes:

  • CO License number
  • Specialty
  • Practice info
  • Phone number(s)
  • NPI#
  • Flu shot status
  • Specific privileges the provider has been granted
  • DEA schedules granted
  • Certifications (BLS, ACLS, Specialty Boards)
  • Photo (if available)

This directory replaces the binders of privileges on each clinical unit AND the spread sheet list of providers with/without flu shots that was available on the G: drive.

Updates are in real time so the list is always current. If you have questions, access difficulties,  or notice corrections are needed, please contact Dian Cleveland at x2205 or dian.cleveland@sclhs.net.

SHINE the light on YOU!

Save the date for the 9th Annual SHINE Conference, you won’t want to miss it this year. The Front Range care sites; Good Samaritan Medical Center, Lutheran Medical Center, Platte Valley Medical Center, and Saint Joseph Hospital have come together to present this year’s SHINE event. Our theme for this year is, SHINE the light on YOU! We will focus on helping you build your professional practice through Evidence Based Practice, as well as giving you tools and resources for your own self care.

SHINE the Light on YOU!

Monday, October 30, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saint Joseph Hospital, Russell Pavilion
1375 East 19th Ave, Denver, CO

You can register in HealthStream using keyword: SHINE9. If you have questions please e-mail Jeremy Smith at Jeremy.Smith3@sclhs.net

Cybersecurity Month: Protecting Healthcare Data

Week  – 2  Protecting Healthcare Data

We kicked off Cybersecurity Awareness Month talking about how to protect you and your family from data breaches. This week we focus on protecting SCL Health and our patients data from breaches.  Healthcare data breaches can have wide ranging impact to our patients and their families, as well as SCL Health.  Due to hackers’ ability to monetize patient data, protected health information will continue to be a top target.

As attackers continue to focus on healthcare, an increase in hospital breaches means the consequences for us will increase if we don’t properly manage risk.

Why cybercriminals attack healthcare more than any other industry

Experts see healthcare as particularly vulnerable to cyber-attacks because medical identity theft remains so lucrative and relatively easy for hackers to exploit – and they continue to find markets for reselling patient data.

Due to hackers’ ability to monetize patient data, electronic health records remain likely to be a top target for hackers.  As more healthcare institutions deploy new mobile applications, it’s possible they will introduce new vulnerabilities that will also be attractive targets.

As attackers continue to focus on healthcare, an increase in hospital breaches means the consequences will also increase.

What healthcare data is targeted?

  • Protected Health Information: This is information which relates to the physical or mental health condition, payment or provision of healthcare that can be associated with an individual.
  • Financial Information: This is financial or monetary information associated with an individual. This could include their bank account or credit card.
  • Intellectual Property: This is information such as patentable inventions, trade secrets and copyrighted works.  This can include medical research, software we have created, medical device innovation and even confidential know-how about our healthcare operations.

Why we protect healthcare data

We are responsible for protecting people’s most private and personal healthcare information.  Unlike credit card numbers or online accounts, private records about a person can never be replaced after a breach. Out of respect and dignity for our patients, it is critical we protect their data. In addition, as a result of the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules and the HITECH Act, we are required by federal law to safeguard healthcare data.  Fortunately, there are easy, practical steps you can take to help protect this valuable information.

Where is healthcare data located?

Healthcare data can reside in places you might least expect.  As such, it is critical you protect any devices and media you are using for work:

  • Desktop and Laptop Computers
  • Smartphones and Tablets
  • External or Portable Hard Drives
  • USB Flash Drives and SD Memory Cards
  • DVDs and CD-ROMs
  • Biomedical Devices
  • Printers, Copiers and Fax Machines

Top Tips for Securing Healthcare Data

  • Passwords: Use a strong, unique password or passcode to protect mobile devices, laptops or computers.  Whenever possible, use two-factor verification (SCL Health uses Duo for remote access). Never share your passwords with anyone, including a supervisor, coworker or the help desk.
  • Control: Keep healthcare data in your personal control at all times and locked inside cabinets or drawers when not in use.  Never leave healthcare data unattended, such as in a vehicle.  Never take any healthcare data out of our facility whether in electronic, paper or other form, unless you have prior authorization.
  • Encryption: Healthcare data should be encrypted whenever you are storing or transmitting it.  For example, when accessing healthcare data online, make sure your browser’s connection is encrypted.  Check to confirm the website starts with HTTPS and there is a closed padlock next to it.
  • Emailing PHI should be done securely by putting (secure) in the subject line of your SCL Health email. This ensures the secure transmission of our patient’s data and any attachments you may be sending.  Please refer to the email encryption instructions here.
  • Sharing: Never share any healthcare data through social media or text messaging, unless it is an SCL approved secure texting solution, for example Zipit at St. Vincent’s.  In addition, you must have prior authorization to use Cloud services. Please refer to the Information Systems Vendor Security Management policy here.

Recommended methods for sharing SCL confidential data

Some SCL Health teams have a need to share files containing protected health information (PHI) or confidential personally identifiable information (PII) for access by various individuals and sometimes at multiple locations. This includes patient identifiable information or other confidential information, such as personnel data, financial information, etc.   You can find the policy on Electronically Storing and Sharing Confidential Information here.

Recommended methods for sharing files containing PHI and PII:

  • ShareFile – Sharefile is the SCL Health approved file sync-n-share solution.  Contact STSC for license information or call the Technical Assistance Center (TAC).
  • Shared Drives
    • Provide access only to those users who need it to perform their jobs
    • Encrypt the files to add another level of security

Acceptable, but not recommended methods for sharing files containing PHI and PII:
SharePoint
(including The Landing)

  • Files containing PHI or PII that are stored in SharePoint must be encrypted

Unacceptable methods for sharing files containing PHI and PII:

Cloud-Based File Sharing Applications (e.g., DropBox)

  • Cloud-based file sharing applications are not approved for sharing confidential information. SCL Health provides the approved Sharefile application for this functionality.

How to encrypt a file:

  • In Microsoft Office 2010 or 2013, open the document you would like to encrypt, click File and select the Info option. Under the Info section, click on the Protect Document option. Choose Encrypt with Password and follow the instructions to enter a password.
  • The password can be a standard, group password. It should not be shared in an email with the link to the files.

Please be on the lookout for further topics every week in October on how to secure and protect SCL Health’s data as well as your personal data from data breaches.

Enterprise Information Security hopes you find the information presented during Cybersecurity Awareness Month useful and helpful.  You can view other cyber education topics on our page on The Landing here or via HealthStream.  It is our intent to not only educate to protect SCL Health but your family and home from cyber-attacks that can have a large impact on your personal life and finances. Thank you for your help in protecting SCL Health and our patients from data breaches.  If you have questions please reach out to enterprisesecurity@sclhs.net.

21 Days to Get Your Flu Vaccine!

Protect yourself and our patients by getting your shot. All employees, volunteers, and medical staff must receive a flu shot before October 31.

This is a firm deadline! The flu vaccine is mandatory unless you have an approved exemption (failure to provide documentation of your flu vaccine by October 31 will result in suspension). There are only two “approved” exemptions for the influenza vaccination:

  • a documented, severe (life-threatening) allergy to eggs or to other components of the influenza vaccine
  • a history of Guillain-Barre Syndrome within six weeks following a previous dose of influenza vaccine.
  • Please contact Employee Health at x1495 as soon as possible if you have an exemption.

The seasonal flu vaccine is free for all employees. Each employee who receives the vaccination will also receive candy and a fountain drink coupon. Vaccines are available on the following dates:

  • October 12 from 6:30 – 11 a.m. in Conf. Rm B.
  • For night shift staff, the House Supervisor will be available to give the shot

We also have a few community clinics available:

  • Walk-In Only, Saturday, October 21, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
  • Kid’s Clinics (for children 10 or under and their families)*
    Mondays, October 16, & 23, 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
    *appointment required for kids clinic only, call X3590 to schedule.

If you’d like to get your flu shot from a non-PVMC clinic, you will need to bring in proof of your vaccination in order to be compliant.

Safety Behavior of the Month: Speak Up, Listen Up

In high reliability organizations, we make a commitment to safety for all associates, patients and visitors. Commit to using and promoting a questioning attitude: Speak Up, Listen Up!

Speak Up For Safety Using ARCC

  • ASK a question
  • REQUEST a change
  • voice a CONCERN
  • use CHAIN OF COMMAND

This technique was first published in commercial aviation as inquiry-advocacy-assertion. The protocol was intended to help first officers (co-pilots) speak up to the captains when they noticed unsafe conditions. The technique is intended to start with an earnest question and progressively increase in assertiveness until the condition prompting the question is resolved to the satisfaction of all. The idea behind the technique is to avoid coming on too strong when a simple question would have sufficed.

Listen Up Using ART
People often don’t speak up because they are unsure of how you will react. Using this tool shows you are committed to safety and welcome questions.
The ART of listening:

  • Demonstrate an ATTITUDE of openness by not becoming defensive or short with the other person.
  • REFLECT back what you have heard to make sure you understand the question or concern.
  • THANK the person for raising the issue or asking the question.

When voicing a concern, use the official safety phrase for SCL Health which is “I have a concern.”

If you would like to post a flyer of this safety behavior, click here to download and print.

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